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Eye Allergies, Or…?

Hey, allergy season. Welcome back to the time of year when everyone blames almost every distress on allergies! Let us help set the record straight though, since certain symptoms are easily assumed as a seasonal allergic reaction when they can actually be a result of something worth looking into further.

Eye Allergies

But okay, we’ll give eye allergies a little bit of attention since they can be the reason for red, itchy, swollen, sensitive, burning, and overall irritated eyes. First and foremost, don’t forget, it’s not just the pollen. There are several things you can be allergic to from trees to animals to new perfumes, even new contact lenses, believe it or not.

The reason behind the reactions you experience is the release of histamines. Histamines are a chemical that causes all the swelling, tears, et cetera, in an attempt to release allergens and help defend your eyes.

While antihistamine pills and eye drops help calm allergic reactions, it’s suggested that over-the-counters aren’t used for more than a couple of days. Ask us about prescribed eye drops that can be used on a more fluid schedule and can healthily harmonize with any existing eye issues such as glaucoma.

Now that we’ve covered eye allergies, let’s talk about other possible culprits.

Eye Allergies or Eye Infections?

girl with irritated dry red eye or allergy female

The reactions might seem as similar as identical twins in the beginning. But the causes are completely unrelated. Eye allergies are caused by allergens and eye infections are caused by substances like bacteria, parasites, and viruses. If they are not appropriately addressed, symptoms can mutate from a mild itch to more intense pain, light sensitivity and thick, slimy discharge.

Another important thing to know about infections vs allergies: infections can spread to others and allergies cannot. Proper hygiene and following ODs guidance are crucial to healing your own eyes and protecting the eyes of others.

Eye Allergies or Dry Eye?

One oddity of dry eye syndrome is that it can lead to watery eyes. This reflex tearing helps to confuse dry eye syndrome and eye allergies. There are so many varied factors that can lead to dry eye. Factors that can develop at any time. One way to help differentiate the two is maintaining awareness of other symptoms that are more prone to dry eye, such as:

  • Heavy eyelids
  • Blurry vision
  • Eye pain that feels different from allergic irritation

Eye Allergies or Adverse Medicinal Reactions?

Some medications can cause severe eye problems, but the puzzling part is they often don’t kick in until after years of use. This is one of the several reasons why it is important to discuss all side effects with your doctors and to share your use of all medications with your trusted optometrist.

Medications that can lead to eye issues fall in every arena. The most common negative results are dry eye, light sensitivity, and in more serious cases, optic nerve damage and loss of visual acuity. If these reactions begin to take place during the months that are often considered “allergy season”, it may be easy to relate them with allergy responses.

Eye allergies usually don’t come on their own. They’re often accompanied by sneezing, a scratchy throat, and a stuffy nose. The best way to confirm the cause? A checkup! Request an appointment on our website with details of what eye irritations you’re looking to calm. Our team at Claflin Eye Care is here to help!

When the Whites of Your Eyes Just… Aren’t Quite White

White eyes have just about the same cosmetic priority as white teeth or unblemished skin. In fact, several surveys reveal that about 30% of people initially notice eyes when they first meet someone. While you can be a generally healthy human with stained teeth and imperfect skin, your eyes can reveal a lot about you… including your health.

First, allow us to introduce you to the sclera. The sclera is simply the medical term for “the white of the eye”. And it comes with high importance.

The sclera is four coats of protection that wrap around most of the eyeball, from the front of the beautiful colored part of the eye- the iris, to the back with sensitive optic nerves. This eye armor is no more than one millimeter thick, which amounts to the thickness of about 10 sheets of paper, layered on top of one another!

The layers of protective armor that give your eye its white color and the sclera its overall strength include randomly patterned collagen fibers and tissues called the episclera, the stroma, the lamina fusca, and the endothelium.

Typically, the entire sclera, not just one layer, changes color or accumulates spots.

Here are 4 hues to keep a lookout for along with a few reasons why:

  1. Yellow: A yellow tone brings along with it a couple of main suspicions, jaundice and “surfer’s eye”.A buildup of red blood cells that are normally filtered out by the liver can have several different causes but can trigger jaundice which often includes a yellowing of the eyes and skin. Surfer’s eye should really be given the nickname of “Outdoor A Lot Eye” as it is a sign of untreated UV damage from the sun combined with high winds or areas filled with dust.
  2. Blue: A tint of blue/gray might not be easy to detect by looking in a mirror, and often these tints are unavoidable because of long-term use of important medications.Tints of blue are still important to observe with help from your OD to consider or dismiss certain health conditions like genetic bone disease or iron deficiency.
  3. Red: Chances are we’ve all experienced eyes with a shade of red, whether it was thanks to allergies or exhaustion or any other typical culprit.
    However, it is still important to schedule an appointment as soon as possible since a red eye can also signal an infection or a broken blood vessel, especially if accompanied by discharge, pain, or blurred vision.
  4. Closeup of an eye of a black manBrown: Brown spots are on both ends of the spectrum. They range from completely harmless to life-threatening. High levels of melanin, the natural skin pigment which makes skin, hair, and the iris of your eyes a darker color can curate spots outside of the iris and within the sclera which are nothing to worry about.
    However, if a dark spot that resembles a freckle that changes over time develops during or after your 30’s, we suggest you make an appointment. These more serious brown spots are not at all melanin-related and can become cancerous if left untreated.

So, when the whites of your eyes just… aren’t quite white, give us a call at 719-276-1660! Keep note of what is accompanying your sclera color change and alert us about anything such as…

    • Blurred vision
    • Discharge
    • Pain
    • Light sensitivity
    • Swelling or bulging

…and our team at Claflin Eye Care will handle the process to lead your eyes—and your entire self—back to health.

Block the Blue Light

Cheerful lovely young girl wearing pajamas laying in bed

Cheerful lovely young girl wearing pajamas laying in bed at the bedroom, using laptop computer

The truth is, blue light isn’t all bad. It shouldn’t be blocked at all times. It can help memory, boost alertness, and elevate your mood! Still, the eye cannot take blue light all day long and it can easily contribute to eye strain especially when it is coming from computer screens, tablets, and cellphones.

These days, we’re working, learning, and relaxing in front of screens emitting blue light all throughout the day—and night. Even your average indoor lightbulb can give off blue light.

You’re probably wondering. Okay, but what is blue light anyway?

Blue light is the highest energy visible light on the UV spectrum, and before the advent of technology, the sun was our only significant source of blue light. Problems arise, however, with the amount of blue light to which we are exposing our brains and bodies, potentially causing undue stress to our eyes and even making it hard to sleep at night.

There are a few ways to avoid this strain. First, let us introduce you to one of the best options on the list: blue light blocking lenses.

What are blue light blocking lenses?

Good question. Glasses equipped with lenses with blue light protection are a simple solution to combat the symptoms caused by increased screen time. The technology in these lenses has a subtle tint that softens harsh blue light rays as they pass through, reducing the amount of blue light to which the wearer’s eyes are exposed. They aren’t heavy or thick and can be made without a prescription attached to them. They can be made to fit adults, teens, and children and are safe for all to wear. All blue light blocking glasses aren’t made the same. They can be made to block a certain percentage of blue light. How much you decide to block, well, that is up to you. Give our practice a call and we will gladly talk you through your options!

What else can I do to block blue light?

While you won’t be able to block it without the correct lens as your shield, you can still manage it.

When working at a computer, for example, you’re often looking up and down, from screen to paper, and your eyes are moving around and refocusing time after time. This is where the 20-20-20 rule can come into play. For every 20 minutes you’re in front of a screen, turn your head and look at something at least 20 feet away for 20 seconds. Just, give your eyes a break.

Another option: simply lower the brightness. The display settings for your screen on your phone or computer allow you to adjust the amount of light seeping from the screen. If your screen looks like a light source, lower the brightness. If your screen looks dull and a bit too dark, it’s okay and probably for the best to brighten it up. A dull screen can also strain your eyes.

Bottom line, protect your eyes the best way you can, and remember that we are here to help! Looking to get a pair of blue light protection glasses that fit your lifestyle and your budget? Here at Claflin Eye Care, we can customize any style of frame and lens prescription with blue light-blocking technology.

When Sweat Stings

People exercising at fitness gym

People exercising at fitness gym

Do your eyes sting when drops of sweat travel down your forehead and into your eyes? Ouch!

You may have noticed that sometimes your eyes feel irritated, and other times, they feel fine. Whether you start to your eyes sting while you’re getting a workout in or just hanging out under the last few days of warm sun, you are not alone, and there are a few reasons why.

While there is no evidence that your sweat can do any harm to your eyes, it would still be nice to avoid the prickly feeling. What it basically comes down to is how you have prepared for your day. Here are a couple things to consider:

Hydration

What sweat consists of on its own is water, salt, proteins, ammonia and other minerals. It is the salty matter that can cause your eyes to become irritated and burn. Luckily, there is a simple way to make sure the salt load is low.

You guessed it. Drink water.

And if not water, a sports drink can also help hydrate you before becoming active or heading out into the sun.

Hair & Skin Care

The sweat that gets into your eyes often makes a couple stops on the way: your scalp, hair, and forehead.

On these pit stops, the sweat picks up some hitchhiker germs and grime like the pomade you added to style your hair or the face cream and sunscreen you massaged into your skin.

Although these products are necessary [#selfcare], they are often formulated with ingredients that your eyes do not particularly care for.

Consider lightening up on the products you apply or pick something a bit more delicate on days when you know you’ll be on the sweatier side.

Block it or Battle it

Some more easy ways to avoid the sting of sweat include using a sweat headband to absorb sweat before it reaches your face, look into a good brand of eyedrops to help relieve any pain, or just close your eyes and splash your face with cool water for a quick fix.

If stinging, burning eyes remain a consistent issue, contact Claflin Eye Care in Cañon City to set up an informative appointment today!

Getting Back to Learning Requires Healthy Vision

august blog image

Fun fact: 80% of the sensory information that reaches our brain comes from our eyes.

Absolutely amazing!

With so much uncertainty as our kids, teens and young adults go back to school this fall, one thing is for sure… our eyes are remarkably important to learning. Not only does 80% of the information to our brain come from our eyes, but also 80% of learning is through our eyes.

Learning and behavioral disorders should not be impulsively assumed without investigating the full spectrum of eye health, especially since vision and eye health issues are not always obvious.

Children who can see well outside of class may still struggle with their vision while learning. Eye alignment, eye teaming, eye movement and coordination, eye focus and dry eyes all influence how we all visually perform.

Take this story, for example. A New York Times article published by Laura Novak in 2007 narrates about a young girl who was prescribed three medications for attention deficit disorder and depression only to find out later that she had been living with convergence insufficiency since birth.

Convergence insufficiency, as outlined by the Mayo Clinic, is a condition where your eyes are unable to work together when looking at nearby objects. It can cause difficulty reading, resulting in school age children promptly deciding to close the book and take on a new task, making it understandable for a parent to conclude that attention deficit is the dilemma.

Parents and educators alike often assume that if our child passes a vision screening, they are ok. Vision screenings are not comprehensive eye exams.

Vision is a sense that is not always automatic. It develops in our formative years, between birth and eight years of age. Comprehensive eye exams can detect issues that once addressed, can have lifelong impacts. For school aged children, the American Optometric Association recommends annual eye exams begin before 1st grade and are maintained each year thereafter.

Let’s give our children the best chance at success! Make sure you get your child’s annual eye health and vision exam checked off your list!

Don’t Do These 11 Things If You Wear Daily Disposable Contacts!

contacts donts 640

Countless people around the world wear daily disposable contact lenses or dailies. These popular single-use lenses are removed and discarded at the end of each day, and a new, fresh pair is inserted the next morning. Used properly, dailies promote eye health, and they’re comfortable and convenient.

Despite the many advantages associated with wearing daily disposables, there are plenty of ways you can damage your eyes and vision — some you may never have considered.

1. Don’t Touch Contacts with Dirty Hands

Before touching your lenses, make sure to wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water. By touching your contact lenses with dirty hands, you transfer bacteria to your lenses, which can lead to an infection. Preferably dry your hands with a disposable paper towel rather than a cloth towel, and ensure that no remnants of the towel remain on your fingers.

2. Don’t Expose Your Contacts to Water

Any source of water, whether tap, pool, or lake water, can change the shape of your lenses and cause micro-abrasions on your cornea. Plus, the water may contain bacteria that can wreak havoc on your eye health and cause you to experience temporary vision loss or even permanent blindness.

If you must get in the water with your contacts on, make sure to wear waterproof goggles. If you do get water on your contact lenses, dispose of these lenses and insert a new pair. Exposing contact lenses to chemicals like chlorine binds to the lens and cannot be cleaned off. It then leeches onto the cornea and causes irritation.

The next time you’re tempted to swim or shower with your lenses on, think twice before doing so.

3. Don’t Reuse Your Contacts

Daily disposable contacts are designed to be thrown away after every single use, and people who reuse them risk painful and risky outcomes. Dailies are thinner, more fragile, and don’t hold moisture as well as other contacts.

Users sometimes attempt to increase the lifespan of these lenses by cleaning them in a disinfecting solution and wearing them for several days or even weeks at a time. This is problematic, as the lens material doesn’t allow for repeated disinfecting. In fact, the process of cleaning the lenses tends to be not only ineffective but also breaks down the lens itself, increasing the risk of the lens falling apart while in the eye. The risk of complications and infection is not worth the few saved bucks.

4. Don’t Insert a Dropped Contact In Your Eye

One of the perks of daily lenses is that they are less expensive (per lens) than other types of contacts. So if you find yourself dropping a lens into the sink or on the floor, don’t bother placing it back in your eye. Doing so can cost you your eye health.

5. Don’t Ever Put Contacts In Your Mouth

It seems like a funny concept, doesn’t it? You wouldn’t believe the number of people who do this. If you drop a contact lens, avoid rooting around the floor trying to find it, and if you do, definitely don’t put it in your mouth to lubricate it. Your mouth contains bacteria that can infect your eyes once you reinsert your contacts.

Play it safe by carrying around an emergency pair of glasses or an extra pair of daily disposable contacts in your bag, your car, or at work.

6. Don’t Overwear Your Daily Lenses

Wearing your lenses for long periods of time can damage your eyes, even if they’re daily contacts. The maximum recommended daily use for any contact lens is 14-16 hours, though Dr. Sean Claflin will determine the exact number of hours you should wear your lenses. Your eyes, just like any other part of your body, need to rest. Your corneas receive oxygen from the air, not from blood vessels, and while it’s healthy to wear contacts during the day, wearing them for extended periods can significantly reduce the amount of oxygen your eyes receive, which can lead to complications. If you don’t give your eyes the rest they need, your corneas might get swollen, which can lead to corneal abrasion and even bacterial infection.

7. Don’t Sleep With Your Lenses

Daily lenses should never be worn overnight. You’re risking your sight by sleeping in a lens that’s not approved for overnight use, as it can lead to ocular irritation, swelling and corneal ulcers.

8. Don’t Insert Contacts Before Completing Your Morning Routine

Avoid inserting your contacts before you shower or wash your face, since you risk exposing your lenses to tap water and the bacteria that come with it. We also recommend that you insert your lenses after blow-drying and styling your hair, especially if you’re using hairspray or other aerosols, as these products can dry out your contacts. Additionally, the spray can coat the lenses and leave a film that not only irritates the eyes, but can make it difficult to see. If you’re at the hairdresser’s and cannot remove your lenses, shut your eyes when spray is applied.

9. Don’t Get Makeup On Your Contacts

Insert your contacts before applying makeup, because any makeup residue on your hands, such as mascara, can easily transfer to your lenses.

It’s not uncommon for people to get concealer, eyeliner or mascara on their contact lenses. If that happens, immediately remove the lens and clean the makeup with solution (while making sure to dispose of the lens before bed). Otherwise, simply replace with another lens. Avoid wearing waterproof makeup, since it can’t always be removed from your lenses, even when rinsed with solution.

To prevent makeup from getting on your lenses, don’t apply mascara all the way from the base of your lashes up. Instead, apply it from the midway point. It’s also important not to apply eyeliner on the inner lid of your eye, but rather to the skin above your lashes.

10. Don’t Wear Contact Lenses If Your Eyes Are Irritated

As the saying goes, “if in doubt – take them out!” If your eyes feel irritated, uncomfortable, or if you notice any pain or redness, don’t power through. If your symptoms last a while, contact Dr. Sean Claflin at Claflin Eye Care. You don’t want to let a serious infection go unchecked.

When your eyes feel more rested and are free of discomfort, put in a fresh pair of contacts.

11. Don’t Rub Your Eyes

If your eyes feel itchy or dry, or if a lens feels out of place, you may be tempted to rub your eyes. But rubbing, whether with contacts or without, can lead to long-term ocular issues. This may cause you to experience blurred vision, and may even damage your cornea. Instead, Dr. Sean Claflin can recommend eye drops to relieve any discomfort. Make sure to apply them only when contact lenses are removed.

Above, we have delved into things you should never do with daily contact lenses. Fortunately, if you do make a mistake, you can remove the lens and replace it with a fresh one. The few dollars you might save by not opening a new pack aren’t worth the damage a mistake can cause.

 

If you have any questions or are interested in finding out more about contact lenses, contact Claflin Eye Care in Cañon City today. Dr. Sean Claflin will be happy to explain how to care for your eyes and maintain your vision.

Safely Applying Eye Drops

A lot of experience with eye care treatments gives us some perspective on best practices in a variety of treatments. If the situation calls for it, we may prescribe eye drops as a treatment for very specific reasons. Eye drops may be needed to treat conditions like pink eye, dry eye, conjunctivitis, glaucoma, and many more.

Applying eye drops is easy once you know the proper technique. It’s a solid trick to have up your sleeve, as some medicines don’t come in a more solid form. Gels and ointments aren’t as difficult to apply because they aren’t liquid.

For the best results, you must apply the eye drops properly. If you use eye drops and the solution isn’t appropriately distributed across the surface of the eye, you or your optometrist might find the eyedrops less effective.

Getting the Best Results from Eye Drops

We follow a set of best practices so that your eye drops can work on your eyes with complete efficiency. That way, you can enjoy symptom relief and complete the course of treatment.

Eye drops can contain different substances in the solution, some of which are organic, like steroids or antibiotics. They need to be applied in such a way that they’re completely absorbed.

Checking the Expiry Date Is Important

Some eye drops are prescription, and some are not, but all will have expiry dates. The eye drops that contain active organic compounds like steroids could have adverse effects if applied past expiry.

Still, other types of eye drops won’t have active organic compounds, but the expiry should be respected even so. The reason why is because the bottle has an expiry too. If liquids sit in a plastic container for too long, they can begin to absorb microscopic plastic particles into the solution, which could end up in your eyes.

6 Steps for Applying Eye Drops

Wash Your Hands

As you’ll be applying the drops to your eyes, your optometrist recommends washing your hands first. Afterward, dry them thoroughly with a clean towel. If your eyes are producing a discharge or have a crust, clean your eyes gently with wet cotton balls. Your optometrist may also recommend lid hygiene wipes. Wipe your eyes from the inner part (nose side) going outward. Wipe the bottle with lukewarm water and soap suds, ensuring the cap is on tight beforehand. Rinse the bottle thoroughly to remove any suds.

Read the Label

Start by carefully reading the label on the bottle. Look for a description that indicates the drops are “for ophthalmic use.” Make sure the drops in hand are the medication your doctor prescribed since your last visit — and make sure they’re the ones that were prescribed to you! You wouldn’t want your roommate’s prescription instead of yours.

Next, check the expiration date. If expired, call your optometrist and pick up a new bottle.

Prepare the Bottle

Once your hands and eyes are clean, gently shake the bottle. Then remove the cap and rest it on a piece of tissue paper. Avoid touching the tip of the bottle where the solution comes out. Touching the tip could line it with microbes, which will be present next time you use it.

Tilt Your Head

To make applying the eye drops easier, tilt your head upwards. Hold the bottle in your dominant hand. As you fix your eyes on a point at the ceiling, use your free hand to pull down your lower eyelid. Doing so creates a pocket where you can pour the drops.

Apply Eye Drops as Instructed

Place the hand holding the bottle above your eye. Give the container a very gentle squeeze, one for each number of drops prescribed by your optometrist in your eye exam. Gently squeeze the bottle according to the number of drops your optometrist prescribed during your eye exam. It might take some practice learning how much pressure to apply, so you don’t overshoot.

Allow the Eye Drops to Settle

Close your eyes and blot the area with a tissue to pick up any excess solution. Press the inner part of your eye to ensure proper absorption of the eye drops. Do this for at least two minutes if you’ll be applying the same solution in the same eye. Replace the cap on the bottle, gently.

If you’ll be applying a different set of eye drops, wait five minutes before following the same procedure.

Keep Using Eye Drops as Directed

Most people will encounter a situation where they need eye drops at least once in their lives. Getting the application right can be a challenge because we have a reflex keeping us from allowing foreign objects or substances into our eyes.

If you apply eye drops correctly and as directed, you’ll probably notice the difference. Following these steps are a surefire way to get past the psychological obstacle. With practice, you can enjoy the gradual relief that various eye drops provide. You’ve got this!

Unclear about any point on how to effectively administer eye drops? Call us! We serve areas throughout Canon City, Florence, Penrose, Westcliffe, Cotopaxi, Howard, and other surrounding areas of Fremont County, Custer County, and Pueblo County.

Essential vs. Non-Essential Eye Care

As we navigate new processes and protocols as a result of the COVID-19 crisis, you may be wondering, what’s the difference between Essential and Non-Essential Eye Care.

Essential Eye Care services include treatment for medical conditions, including urgent care needs that keep patients from carrying out their regular daily routines. These include:

  • Blurred vision
  • Broken or lost eyewear
  • Eye trauma
  • Vision loss
  • Contact lens-related pain
  • Flashes or floating objects in the eye
  • Light sensitivity
  • Double vision
  • Drooping eyelid
  • Severe or recurring headaches

We are equipped to handle your Essential Eye Care needs so you do not have visit the ER – which may put you at risk of exposure to infection while also potentially taking from patients with critical conditions having no other alternatives.

Non-Essential Eye Care services might also be called “routine,” and not impeding a patient from his/her day-to-day activities, such as:

  • Routine eye exam with no problems
  • First time routine contact lens fittings

As always, our top priority is always your well-being. If you have questions or concerns about any eye health or eye care services – reach out! We are here to help you in any way we can!

8 Tips to Relieve Winter Dry Eyes

Whether you live in a climate with cold winter weather or you are planning a ski trip up north, winter can be a challenge if you suffer from dry eyes. Dry, cool air, cold winds and even drier indoor heating can cause eye irritation, burning, itchiness and redness, and sometimes even excessively watery eyes as more tears are produced to compensate for the dryness. Many people have a chronic feeling that they have something in their eye and some even experience blurred vision. These symptoms can be debilitating!

Dry eyes is one of the most common complaints eye doctors get from patients during the winter season, especially in the cooler climates. That’s why we’d like to share some tips on how to relieve dry eye discomfort, and how to know when your condition is serious enough to come in for an evaluation.

Tips to Relieve Winter Dry Eyes:

  1. Keep eyes moist using artificial tears or eye drops. You can apply these a few times each day when the eyes are feeling dry or irritated. If over-the-counter drops don’t help or if you have chronic dry eyes, speak to your eye doctor about finding the best drops for you. Since not all artificial tears are the same, knowing the cause of your dry eye will help your eye doctor determine which brand is best suited for your eyes.
  2. Use a humidifier to counteract the drying effects of indoor heaters or generally dry air.
  3. Point car vents or indoor heaters away from your face when the heat is on. Try to keep your distance from direct sources of heating, especially if they blow out the heat.
  4. Drink a lot! Hydrating your body will also hydrate your eyes.
  5. Protect your eyes outdoors with sunglasses or goggles – the bigger the better! Larger, even wrap-around glasses as well as a hat with a wide brim will keep the wind and other elements out of your eyes. If you wear goggles for winter sports, make sure they fit well and cover a large surface area.
  6. Soothe dry eyes using a warm compress and never rub them! Rubbing your eyes will increase irritation and may lead to infection if the hands are not clean.
  7. Give your eyes a digital break. People blink less during screen time which is why extensive computer use can lead to dry eyes. Follow the 20/20/20 rule by taking a break every 20 minutes to look 20 feet away for 20 seconds and make sure you blink!
  8. For contact lens wearers: If you wear contact lenses, dry eyes can be particularly debilitating as the contact lenses can cause even further dryness and irritation. Contact lens rewetting drops can help your eyes feel better and may also allow you to see more clearly. Not all eyedrops are appropriate for use with contact lenses, so ask your optometrist which eyedrop is compatible with your contacts and cleaning solution. If rewetting drops don’t help, consider opting for glasses when your dry eyes are bad, and speak to your optometrist about which brands of contact lenses are better for dry eyes. Many people find dry eye improvement when they switch to daily single use contact lenses.

Chronic Dry Eyes or Dry Eye Syndrome

Dry eye syndrome is a chronic condition in which the eyes do not produce enough tear film, or do not produce the quality of tear film needed to properly keep the eyes moist. While winter weather can make this condition worse, it is often present all year round. If you find that the tips above do not alleviate your discomfort or symptoms, it may be time to see a optometrist to see if your condition requires more effective medical treatment.